When discussing the ancient civilization that flourished in the Andes of South America, many people are unsure whether to use the term “Inca” or “Incan.” Both terms are used, but which one is correct?

The answer is that both “Inca” and “Incan” are technically correct, but they are used in different ways.

The term “Inca” is used as a noun to refer to the rulers of the Inca Empire or the people who belonged to the ruling class of the empire. As an adjective, “Inca” is used to describe anything that is related to the Inca Empire or culture. For example, we might say “Inca civilization” or “Inca architecture.”

On the other hand, “Incan” is used as an adjective to describe anything that is related to the Inca people or their language, Quechua. For example, we might say “Incan traditions” or “Incan language.”

So, to sum up, if you are referring specifically to the rulers or the empire, you would use “Inca” as a noun. If you are referring to anything related to the culture, you would use “Inca” as an adjective. If you are referring to anything related to the people or their language, you would use “Incan” as an adjective.

It’s worth noting that some people prefer to use one term over the other for stylistic or personal reasons. However, in academic and scholarly writing, it’s important to use the correct terminology to avoid confusion or misinterpretation.

Regardless of which term you choose to use, it’s clear that the Inca civilization was one of the most impressive and advanced ancient societies in the world. From their remarkable engineering feats, such as the intricate network of roads and bridges that connected their empire, to their sophisticated agricultural practices that allowed them to grow crops in the harsh Andean environment, the Inca left a lasting legacy that continues to fascinate and inspire people to this day.